Category Archives: bathurst: my home town

let me show you round

A tale of Bathurst and her big, white, fluffy doona.

We are trying to walk Mount Panorama every Saturday morning, a friend and I.

Sometimes when the town is cloaked in fog and bed feels especially snuggly it’s hard to make the effort.

fog and bird mount panorama

But last Saturday we were well rewarded for our efforts.

fog lifting and kangaroos mount panorama

Most people walk the track itself, but as we are uninclined to get wiped out on one of its sweeping corners by a passing car (and mark my words it will happen one day), well we take a fenced off, gated, padlocked hidden path.

Just don’t tell anyone please because it’s one of Bathurst’s best kept secrets.

the back road up mount panorama

It was the weekend of the winter solstice, that delicious annual turning point when one moment we’re staring down the barrel at the shortest, darkest day of the year then overnight the odds have turned in our favour and suddenly longer days and warm summer nights appear on our winter horizon.

mount panorama above the fog

The Bathurst valley was a sea of fog – the town is down there somewhere, keeping her toes warm under her big, white, fluffy doona.

pathway and telegraph poles overlooking bathurst in fog

But up above it was crystal blue and white and warm. So unseasonably warm.

fog blue sky and mountains

This is the highest point of the track, Brock’s Skyline. It’s named after Australian motor racing legend Peter Brock who won the Bathurst 1000 nine times. At the end of this straight the track takes a sudden exhilarating drop into the Esses.

track mount panorama

mount panorama

But we, well we quietly make our way up and down and down and up our secret path.

polly on the track behind mount panorama

And no-one is any the wiser. Are they Pol?

x

 

If you enjoyed this I’ve handpicked a couple more for you …

In which her shadow rolls over and says go on without me …

While you were sleeping …

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The last to leave the party

Bathurst has been all reds and oranges and yellows for weeks.

The party is over. But there are still a few hangers on.

the hangers on

The riot of autumn …

red oil drum

Those last warm evenings …

ochre drum

They are well behind us.

concrete and greys

And our little corner of the world is getting sleepy.

Macquarie River Bathurst

And quiet.

Macquarie River Bathurst

I think it’s nature’s way of saying stop …

hay bale

Just stop for a while.

And enjoy the stillness.

 

I’m listening.

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Bathurst, begonias and a visit from Baldrick

Bathurst begonia house

While all of Bathurst donned their fascinators and 4 inch heels and wobbled out to the Soldier’s Saddle Race Day on Friday, I had a day at home nesting, or as an online friend of mine put it recently, a day of contented puttering.

The house was in good shape, the grapevine at her autumn best, Steve was out playing two up (an Anzac Day tradition) and I was literally about to pour myself a glass of wine when there was a knock at the door and I opened it to find one of my long lost friends from uni days.

I love surprise visits.

Matthew was in town with Sir Tony Robinson aka Baldrick from Black Adder fame and more recently from England’s Time Team. Time Team has apparently been so well received in Australia that Tony is now on his third history series Down Under, this particular one focusing on war stories and war memorabilia. Next year marks the centenary of Gallipoli, a huge event in Australia’s history and as Bathurst is Australia’s oldest inland settlement, due to celebrate its bicentenary next year, it was fitting that Bathurst was added to their itinerary.

The History Channel's brochure on Bathurst

So in between various shoots around the region, Matthew (the series director) took up residence beside our fire and it was so good to have some real time for a one on one catchup. On Sunday they’d organised a big community day where people were invited to bring their bits and pieces along for experts to assess.

Tony Robinson in Bathurst

Steve dug out a couple of old World War 1 medals which had been sitting in a drawer at the guesthouse at Duckmaloi for years and he’s passed them on to an organisation called Medals Gone Missing that seeks to reunite lost medals with related family members. There could be a nice story in that down the track if they find a home.

Anyway we had a lovely couple of hours in Machattie Park being bossed around by Matthew. Some things never change ;)

Matthew directing Tour of Duty

Very impressed on the sideline watching Sir Tony with the crowd. Obviously a very talented, sharp and seasoned performer. Interestingly he was knighted last year, not for his services to drama, but for his services to the Labor Party. 

Tony Robinson in Bathurst

A stroll through the nearby Begonia House.

Bathurst begonia house

Bathurst Begonia House

And back to the fire and the finale of Downton Abbey. Nothing like a bit of home cooking and couch time when you’re on the road.

Expected a cliff hanger with the end of season 4 of Downton but all we were left with was the promise of some geriatric romance between the butler Mr Carson and housekeeper Mrs Hughes. No suggestion that Mary might find some more facial expressions any time soon. To be honest I’m not sure I’ll be backing up for Series 5.

Meanwhile, flicking between channels, Scott Cam, the host of reality TV renovation show The Block, won Australia’s Gold Logie, Australia’s top award in television, a bit like America’s Emmys, only not. Really Australia? Really? I actually quite enjoy The Block because I’m a sucker for a nail gun and some psychological mind games but don’t get me started …

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